Heat Pipe Article in 1968

ELECTRICALLY INSULATING MATERIALS were used exclusively in the construction of this heat pipe, designed to remove large quantities of heat from high-voltage electrical circuits. The containment vessel is made of glass, the wick of fiber glass, and the working fluid is a fluoridated hydrocarbon. The two tubes extending from the pipe are employed to measure thermal conductance. circa. 1960’s

ELECTRICALLY INSULATING MATERIALS were used exclusively in the construction of this heat pipe, designed to remove large quantities of heat from high-voltage electrical circuits. The containment vessel is made of glass, the wick of fiber glass, and the working fluid is a fluoridated hydrocarbon. The two tubes extending from the pipe are employed to measure thermal conductance. circa. 1960’s

The original heat pipe operating principle was developed by Richard S. Gaugler of the General Motors Corporation in 1942. Modern heat pipe technology was originated from the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory by George Grover in 1963. Advanced Cooling Technologies’ Yale Eastman (currently a Director of ACT), a few years later describes the theory and history of the heat pipe technology in an article published in Scientific American, May 1968. Since then, heat pipe technology has progressed from cooling vacuum tubes to being applied on the CPU chip of modern lap top computers. Heat pipes are even cooling satellites electronics in zero gravity orbit. Heat pipes are highly efficient conductors of heat and can transport, in some cases, 1000’s times better than a solid copper conductor.

The Heat Pipe (PDF, 480K)